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Artist


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An artist is a person engaged in an activity related to creating art, practicing the arts, or demonstrating an art. The common usage in both everyday speech and academic discourse refers to a practitioner in the visual arts only. However, the term is also often used in the entertainment business, especially in a business context, for musicians and other performers (although less often for actors). "Artiste" (French for artist) is a variant used in English in this context, but this use has become rare. Use of the term "artist" to describe writers is valid, but less common, and mostly restricted to contexts like used in criticism.


During the Middle Ages the word artist already existed in some countries such as Italy, but the meaning was something resembling craftsman, while the word artisan was still unknown. An artist was someone able to do a work better than others, so the skilled excellency was underlined, rather than the activity field. In this period, some "artisanal" products (such as textiles) were much more precious and expensive than paintings or sculptures.


Many contemporary definitions of "artist" and "art" are highly contingent on culture, resisting aesthetic prescription, in much the same way that the features constituting beauty and the beautiful cannot be standardized easily without moving into kitsch.


The US Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies many visual artists as either craft artists or fine artists.[4] A craft artist makes handmade functional works of art, such as pottery or clothing. A fine artist makes paintings, illustrations (such as book illustrations or medical illustrations), sculptures, or similar artistic works primarily for their aesthetic value.


The main source of skill for both craft artists and fine artists is long-term repetition and practice.[4] Many fine artists have studied their art form at university, and some have a master's degree in fine arts. Artists may also study on their own or receive on-the-job training from an experienced artist.


The number of available jobs as an artist is increasing more slowly than other fields.[4] About half of US artists are self-employed. Others work in a variety of industries. For example, a pottery manufacturer will employ craft artists, and book publishers will hire illustrators.


In the US, fine artists have a median income of approximately US$50,000 per year, and craft artists have a median income of approximately US$33,000 per year.[4] This compares to US$61,000 for all art-related fields, including related jobs such as graphic designers, multimedia artists, animators, and fashion designers.[4] Many artists work part-time as artists and hold a second job.[4]


Since 1986, Artist Trust has invested over $15 million in individual artists of all disciplines in Washington State through grants and professional development programs. As a fundraising organization, we rely on support from our community to make this work possible.


Artist Trust has awarded more than $15 million in funding to artists in Washington State through merit and need based grants. To help artists create strong applications, we include grant support programs such as one-on-one consultations with us, how to apply webinars, study halls, and reference guides.


Artist INC addresses the specific business needs and challenges artists of all disciplines face every day. In its full iteration, Artist INC Live, participants gather for one night a week for eight weeks to learn business skills specific to their art practice and how to apply those skills cooperatively with their peers. Using a groundbreaking class design, artists learn and grow together through artist facilitator mentoring, small group application activities, as well as large group discussion and multi-media workshop.


Gathering for one night a week for eight weeks, participants learn business skills specific to their art practice and how to apply those skills cooperatively with their peers. Using a groundbreaking class design, artists learn and grow together through artist facilitator mentoring, small group application activities, as well as large group discussion and multi-media lecture.


In the What Works Workshop, Artist INC Peer Facilitators share these behaviors as well as share personal and professional examples of their own and leave artists ready to apply them to their own art practice. Usually offered virtually, it is free to participants with registration.


Artist INC Advance is a program of Artist INC that is geared specifically toward artist-led projects and provides direct network support and professional development in project management, planning, communications, and financial management.


Artist Leadership Fellow program selects artists who are nominated by community partner organizations from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives. Over a course of eight weeks, the artists meet virtually with the facilitators to explore and develop professional aspects of their work as leaders in their communities.


Under applicable state legislation and the City's Zoning Resolution, certification as a working artist is necessary in order for an individual to qualify for joint living-working space in the M1-MA and M1-MB zoning districts (SoHo NoHo). This permits fine artists working on a professional level who demonstrate a need for a live/work loft to reside in specific lofts zoned for manufacturing. Pursuant to the City's Zoning Resolution, the Department of Cultural Affairs has been designated as the certifying agency. Please click here for an application and additional information.


Many artists work in fine- or commercial-art studios located in office buildings, warehouses, or lofts. Others work in private studios in their homes. Some artists share studio space, where they also may exhibit their work.


About 5,900 openings for craft and fine artists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.


Craft and fine artists use a variety of materials and techniques to create original works of art for sale and exhibition. Craft artists create objects, such as pottery, glassware, and textiles, that are designed to be functional. Fine artists, including painters, sculptors, and illustrators, create pieces of art more for aesthetics than for function.


Fine artists typically display their work in museums, in commercial or nonprofit art galleries, at craft fairs, in corporate collections, on the Internet, and in private homes. Some of their artwork may be commissioned (requested by a client), but most is sold by the artist or through private art galleries or dealers. The artist, gallery, and dealer together decide in advance how much of the proceeds from the sale each will keep.


Most craft and fine artists spend their time and effort selling their artwork to potential customers and building a reputation. In addition to selling their artwork, many artists have at least one other job to support their craft or art careers.


Some artists work in museums or art galleries as art directors or as archivists, curators, or museum workers, planning and setting up exhibits. Others teach craft or art classes or conduct workshops in schools or in their own studios. For more information on workers who teach art classes, see the profiles on kindergarten and elementary school teachers, middle school teachers, high school teachers, career and technical education teachers, and postsecondary teachers.


Digital artists use design and production software to create interactive art online. The digital imagery may then be transferred to paper or some other form of printmaking or made available directly on web-accessible devices.


Fiber artists use fabric, yarn, or other natural and synthetic materials to weave, knit, crochet, or sew textile art. They may use a loom to weave fabric, needles to knit or crochet yarn, or a sewing machine to join pieces of fabric for quilts or other handicrafts.


Jewelry artists use metals, stones, beads, and other materials to make objects for personal adornment, such as earrings or necklaces. For more information about other workers who create jewelry, see the profile on jewelers and precious stone and metal workers.


Sketch artists are a type of illustrator who often use pencil, charcoal, or pastels to create likenesses of subjects. Their sketches are used by law enforcement agencies to help identify suspects, by the news media to show courtroom scenes, and by individual customers for their own enjoyment.


Video artists record avant-garde, moving imagery that is typically shown in a loop in art galleries, museums, or performance spaces. These artists sometimes use multiple monitors or create unusual spaces for the video to be shown.


Studios are usually well lit and ventilated. However, artists may be exposed to fumes from glue, paint, ink, and other materials. They may also have to deal with dust or other residue from filings, splattered paint, or spilled cleaning and other fluids. Artists often wear protective gear, such as breathing masks and goggles, in order to remain safe from exposure to harmful materials. Ceramic and glass artists must use caution in working with materials that may break into sharp pieces and in using equipment that can get very hot, such as kilns.


Most craft and fine artists work full time, although part-time and variable schedules are also common. Many hold another job in addition to their work as an artist. During busy periods, artists may work additional hours to meet deadlines. Those who are self-employed usually determine their own schedules. 59ce067264






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